An opportunity for our students to add their voice to Triple J’s ‘Hack’ program about ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’

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We were pleasantly surprised to receive an email from the producer of Hack on triple J:

“My name is Claire and I’m the Producer of Hack on triple j – Australia’s national current affairs program for young (16-30) people reaching one million listeners a week across the country.
We’re talking to one of the directors of the Netflix adaptation of The Handmaid’s Tale on Monday and I came across your subject guide for the novel.
Would you have time for a quick chat about the work this afternoon? Margaret Atwood has said that “I made a rule for myself: I would not include anything that human beings had not already done in some other place or time, or for which the technology did not already exist.”
We’re keen to create a segment online and on-air about this – and I’d like to hear your thoughts.”

After a conversation between Claire and English teacher, Ms Amanda Carroll, students were invited to participate in the program. We thanked Claire for the opportunity for our students to be involved in this excellent radio program.

Listen to year 11 student, Hrishi Thatiot, speaking to presenter Sarah McVeigh on Triple J’s program for youth, “Hack”, about “The Handmaid’s Tale”, a text our year 11s are currently studying, and one which, although written over 30 years ago, is relevant to us today, and has been reinterpreted by SBS and is currently available for viewing. The presenter also speaks to the director of the TV show, and a climate futurist on food security. (Hrishi: 9.54 – 11.03).

Follow this link to listen to the podcast.

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Year 9s raise the bar for poetry – slam!


Above: 9L Slam Poetry winners, Ivan and Yi Ming and their English teacher, Mr Mahoney

Yesterday Memorial Hall was host to  performance and celebration as the winning teams from each year 9 class amazed the audience with their Slam Poetry performances.

The judges were extremely impressed with the high standard of all teams’ poetry and their powerful renditions.


Runners up, the team from 9E (Ms Hamilton), performing Safwan’s poem

The winning team was 9L (Mr Mahoney’s class), followed by 9E (Ms Hamilton’s class) in second place and 9D (Ms Grimwade’s class) in third. The Best Individual Performance was awarded to Ivan Tat of 9L, and the Best Line was also awarded to 9L.

Poverty is the cracked lips of a boy, hands outstretched, eyes like a dead fish, …

There is so much to celebrate in the year 9 students’ poetry! I’d like to take the opportunity to share some of the poetry.

Standout lines from 9A:

A blind man will never know the colour of blue nor ever see the so-called ordinary hue

But he know he does not need to discover the new.

He’s surrounded like an animal in a zoo,

Caged by prejudice and stereotypes.

A slice of 9B’s offering:

Patriotism, loyalty: who do I please?

Lion Dairy, Abbey, and Colby: three types of cheese.

Which industry do I support?

Which farmer do I make abort?

An Irish cow, an Australian goat, an American sheep,

Which allegiance do I keep?

Or should I be like sister Tegan,

And just like her become a Vegan?

Powerful, dark lines from 9C:

His mind is out to kill him

So far his mind is winning

It sews his lips

Shuts his mouth

Beats him, blinds him from those who care,

Tying him down to the bottom of the ocean,

Drowning him

He can’t die

He can’t escape

He is drowning 24/7.

He’s been drowning since he was 11

Yet no one saw and we all breathed around him.

Powerful lines from 9D:

But why has our society become one where such people are glamorised and idolised

While teens are hurting themselves and hurting others over their own demise,

Because their waist size is over 26 inches, because their skin is wrinkled and because, unlike their role models

their looks aren’t stylised?

They think that, that is something to be ashamed about

It seems we regret celebrity influence upon teens,

The roots and trunk of our future, hollowed out like logs

To be only superficial and not care about what’s on the inside.

But our current generation can still be saved without doubt

If we look up to Mandela, Churchill and Malala

Instead of Minaj, West and Gaga.

From the runners up, 9E:

You may say that you wish to live forever,

That you wish to die never,

But our eventual passing is what gives our life its merit,

The looming presence of death is what motivates us to get out of bed each morning,

Because we may not always have a tomorrow,

The looming presence of death is what lets us perceive the true beauty of our lives,

The looming presence of death is what gives our life its momentum,

It is not the vindictive venom we make it out to be,

Can’t you see?

Death is what coerces us to be alive.

From 9F:

Until this day I never thought dragons existed…

… Yet today I found one, lips curled in a ferocious snarl,

dressed in a satiny carpet of brilliant, crimson scales, and with eyes…

… This dragon was none other than the one that dwelled within me,

the one which I have tried to subdue for so long.

It is eating me, chewing at the fibres of my identity.

This dragon’s name is Guilt.

From 9G:

I thought I knew who I was.

I thought I was that person who would always do well in school,

That person who should be popular and loved,

That person who could shove other people aside to get what he wanted,

The centre of the universe.

The world would revolve around the brightness of my glow and the other planets would looks to me with envy and greed,

knowing they could never reach me.

I knew who I was.

I was happy.

I was content.

I was frolicking inside the beautiful meadow in my little bubble,

skipping in time with the beat that had been set out for me.

From 9H:

The powers of the world don’t like change,

So they shut up the game-breakers,

the would-be preachers,

the idea makers, because their system only works

when nothing changes, so they keep them quiet,

with only their malicious greed behind it,

planting the seed.

When the seed grows, it turns into a tree,

and when a tree grows tall, it’s hard to cut down…

From 9J:

My speech I left like a house on fire,

But this time my words won’t misfire.

That bully, it’s time to confront him,

To show I’m not just a melting icecream.

Without dismay, without distress,

Chest out, back straight.

Because I will take on the dare.

From 9K:

Blinks of cosmic glitter twinkled  in the sky

shimmering with an exuberant brilliance

as it stained the rich vermillion sunset.

The place where the sky met the sea

Had a majestical topography.

and a favourite line of mine:

They tormented the sky, tearing the delicate canvas,

Its colour a conflux that couldn’t stop bleeding…

And, to honour 9L’s winning poem, here is the full text:

9L  Ivan and Yi Ming

Poverty

 

Somewhere in Australia they are incinerating

Designer handbags, never used, to maintain brand exclusivity

Whilst in inner-suburbia there is a child digging through

The Salvo’s donation tip for a jacket that can last them the winter

Somewhere in Australia they are building boutique apartments

And fancy shopping malls so that we forget that

Unemployment is soaring

Homelessness is soaring

Poverty is the cracked lips of a boy, hands outstretched, eyes like a dead fish,

it is the blackened toenails of the outworker, chest compressing with each breath

Do you not hear the lullaby of a mother hunched in a rusty old car in a parking lot at night?

Do the cries of the homeless who scream with fleshy pink throats fall upon your deaf ears?

Do you hear the peoples sing: but only until it stops making you feel comfortable

Because it is better to be silent, hold our tongues

Bow our heads in defeat and get back to work

Then for you to acknowledge that the wealth, the privilege you accumulated

Was built on the blood and bones of the oppressed minorities

Built on the sweat and tears of the homeless and overworked

Is it truly benevolence when you throw a piece of stale bread

To the people whose homes you drove them out of?

Our narrative, our stories aren’t your pay-per-view poverty porn to ogle at

Do not throw us your scraps, your pittances for us

For us to climb onto the back of other others to reach for

We were confined to lifetimes hunched over, lifeless, in factory plants

Lethargic and weary as pawns in your pyramid scheme

Would you rather us complacent and obedient slaves?

 

(SHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH)

Do we scare you?

Since when has saying nothing done anything?

This is not an outlet to spruik your faux philanthropy

This is not an appeal for a rich people Jesus to come to our salvation

We learnt the hard way that in the snaking queues of Centrelink

Under the Flinders Street bridge at night that there is no god pining for us

We don’t care if you don’t want to believe we exist but we believe in you!

Each and every one of you are complicit in our death

On the streets, in rusty cars, in public housing units,

Guilty whether by consent, complacency, indifference.

The only way to enact social change, to close up the crackswe have fallen into is

To lend a hand, give a shoulder to cry on, open up your ears.

This is a conversation.

Won’t you listen?

 

 

A huge thank you to Ms Buckland for organising this event, to all the English teachers involved for hard work and inspiration, to Ms Morgan and Mr Sloan for judging (I can’t thank myself, but I enjoyed the judging experience so much), and to Ms Tsilimidos for her unrivalled skills as M.C.! A big thank you to our wonderful stage and film crew, Brett and Mr Morton.

 

Our students contribute to Q&A’s Schools Special Victoria program

It was exciting to see some of our students in the audience for this week’s Q&A: Schools Special Victoria, with Louis Gordon asking the first question!

On the panel: Josh Frydenberg, Minister for the Environment and Energy; Catherine King, Shadow Health Minister; Pinidu Chandrasekera, Parade College, Bundoora; Aretha Brown, Williamstown High School; Jock Maddern, Kaniva College; and Jacinta Speer, The MacRobertson Girls’ High School.

Our panel discussed: marriage equality, the proposed PaTH program, rural youths, youth unemployment and the voting age.

Australia’s first non-profit crepe van: Crepes for Change

We were overjoyed to discover that as part of Language Week we could buy crepes all day long. Turned out to be a cute pink van with 3 of our old boys making and selling crepes. But wait! There’s more: it’s part of a social enterprise founded by old boy, Dan Poole, to help disadvantaged and homeless youth.

I can’t say it any better than the ‘about us’ on their website:

Crêpes for Change is a project that has been a dream for a long time.

We live in an exciting time full of opportunities to be had, but the sad reality is that not everyone starts off on the same level. Many lack not only the tangible basics such as food and accommodation, but also the things that shape a person’s life immeasurably: a loving family, inspiring teachers and mentors, support from their community and people who will give them a shot. It’s heartbreaking to see people unable to leverage themselves out of a bad situation.

Our goal is to be able to employ,  train and support young people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness, and allow them to find long-term employment and prosper on their own.

We are proud of you, boys! We recognized Terence Felix’s smiling face (thanks for the recommendation of salted caramel which partially ended up on my dress but also mostly in my mouth – so good!). Dan was creating the crepes, and sorry we didn’t know who the other young man was. Check out their website and read about the initiative and how you can get involved.

 

You can follow Crepes for Change on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

 

How to get ready for Cross Country if you’re creative

How to get ready for Cross Country if you’re creative –

Firstly, you have an idea for what you’re going to wear. You gather fabric, needle and thread, scissors, etc.

You start sewing but time is running out so you enlist friends.

Hmmm… let’s see how this is going…

It’s coming together…

A few details

A bit of fun in between…

Now help me put this on…

Hurry, sew me up so I can get to Albert Park Lake on time for the run!

Is our library a Makerspace? Sure is!

Brilliant, Sam Bi. And great work helping out, Karan Luthra!

Origami keeps appearing. Mindfulness in the library.

As if by magic origami creations keep appearing in the library. All we do is leave out paper and then paper cranes, flowers or abstract paper things appear. It’s lovely to see students quietly and slowly folding paper amongst the usual bustle and roar of daily library activities. A mindfulness exercise? Definitely.

I happen to know that the rose was made by Truman Wang. What is that you’re making now, Truman?