Winding up for the end of the year

So it’s a curious time of year when the regular pace and routine are disrupted by wonderful messy projects such as the year 9 city scavenger hunt, the year 9 city project (research/documentary), for the first time the year 10 Innovation Project which gives students the opportunity to make significant changes in the school, presenting to a panel of professionals to be shortlisted for the successful three teams – and lots of singing in between (LOTS of singing!)

I wanted to share some photos of this busy, happy time.

Year 9s waiting to watch the winning Melbourne documentaries.

The winners receiving their accolades.

In between all of this the library is a hub of old fashioned activity.

Juggling

Games for people with tiny fingers.

GeoGuessr

Board games

Lego

Next Monday the library assistants and Writing Interest Group (WIG – formerly Competition Writing) are joining for a big party, The Madhatter’s Tea Party, to be precise.

And of course, there are always BOOKS!

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Hipsters of Melbourne – student film

Some of the most enjoyable experiences at school happen when students are actually out of school – don’t you think? At the end of the year we release our year 9s into the city to research an aspect of urban life of their choice. The final result is a presentation of videos created by the student groups. These are seriously informative and entertaining. Here is one of them created by Lachlan Scanlon and his team members. I’m afraid there are some in-jokes here but I think you’ll still enjoy the video.    

Currently I’m working with Lachie to create library tutorial videos. If anyone can make a dry subject entertaining I think it will be Lachie.

Library Allsorts – update on recent library happenings

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What’s been happening in our library? Like many other school libraries, we’ve been signing students up for a few Melbourne Writers’ Festival workshops, including the one by Arnold Zable pictured above. Denise has donned her Grim Reaper costume to scare students into putting their names down for groups taking part in the second BookWiz competition (book related trivia) at Melbourne High School. Well, not exactly ‘scare’ but she does get noticed.

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We’re opening up more of our books and displaying them in the traffic areas with positive results. Books actually get noticed this way! unnamed (9)

I couldn’t believe how many students and teachers stopped to look at these illustrations. unnamed (2)

The TV is on all day every day – on mute – on the ABC 24 hour news channel. I don’t know why we didn’t do this earlier.unnamed (3)

Students are still playing chess ALL DAY LONG. Not the same students of course. unnamed (5)

Good opportunity to bring out the chess and other strategy game books – right next to the players.

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We still have a wide variety of self-initiated activities happening in the library during recess and lunchtimes. We don’t always understand what is involved but the students obviously do. Notice the nice mix of technology with paper games. unnamed (4)

Data mining continues to be highly esoteric. Here you can see the data being collected for ‘If you could choose to have a superpower, what would it be?’ unnamed clear       unnamed (13)

As you can hopefully see, teleportation and invisibility rank the highest in student-desired superpowers. Commanding an army of ducks has surprising high results too.

One thing I can say with certainty, there is no place for boredom in Melbourne High School library.

Visit to The Library at the Dock

We took the opportunity to visit The Library at the Dock on a report writing day when our library was being used for the GAT in the morning. What a beautifully designed community building on a site with impressive views from all angles.

From the City of Melbourne website:

Library at The Dock is a three-storey building, 55.3 metres long by 18.1 metres wide, and is made from engineered timber and reclaimed hardwood.

Read about the building’s sustainability features (PDF, 600kb).

As well as a traditional library collection, the library and community centre offers an interactive learning environment and a state-of-the-art digital collection, multi-purpose community spaces and a performance venue that holds 120 people. Connections to Docklands’ rich maritime and Aboriginal heritage is embraced and celebrated with facilities to support local historical research and educational experiences.

Apparently the building was pre-fabricated in Austria and put together in 60 days on site by 6 carpenters. I hope I remembered that information correctly.

I took photos from all angles. As you can see, the library has plenty of space and light, glass everywhere, beautiful wooden surfaces and tasteful furnishings.

Image Image (1) Image (2) Image (3) Image (4) Image (5) Image (6) Image (7) Image (8) Image (9) Image (10) Image (11) Image (12) Image (13) Image (14) Image (15) Image (17) Image (18) Image (19) Image (20) Image (21) Image (22) Image (23) Image (24) Image (25) The returns sorter –

 

Image (26) Image (27) Image (28) Image (29) Image (30) Image (31) Image (32) Image (33) Image (34) Image (35) Image (36)There is a Makerspace! and of course a 3D printer –
Image (38) Image (39) Image (40) Image (41) Image (42) Image (43) Image (44) Image (45) Image (46) Image (47) Image (48) Image (49) Image (50) Image (51) The children’s section was so much fun! Image (52) Image (53) Image (54) Image (55) Image (56) Image (57) Image (58) Image (59)

 

Obviously this library is completely out of our financial range, but it’s always good to take some ideas from well designed spaces.

Official opening of our new library spaces

The first of April 2014 saw the grand, official, opening of Melbourne High School’s new library spaces, including a welcoming, attractive entrance, more spacious reading spaces, and study rooms. Attending were principal Jeremy Ludowyke, assistant principals Dr Janet Prideaux, Andrew Sloan and David Smyth, school council members, architects Michael Fooks and Leah Reynolds, patrons and friends of the school including many old boys, student representatives and library staff.

We were honoured to welcome Mrs Mary Crean, long-standing volunteer and patron of our library for more than 30 years. Mrs Crean was assisted in the official unveiling of the donors’ plaque by her two sons, Simon Crean (former Leader of the Federal Opposition) and David Crean (former Tasmanian Treasurer) – both Melbourne High School Old Boys.

Principal Ludowyke gave a potted history of the library, and reminded those present that Melbourne High School was one of the first government school libraries to employ trained librarians, setting a precedent for other schools to follow.

This is the first in a staged plan for the renewal of our library spaces to provide more options for our students and assist in their transition to the tertiary environment and into the wider world.

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                       Mary Crean with her sons, Simon and David

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          Principal Jeremy Ludowyke at the unveiling

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   Assistant Principal, David Smyth, chatting with guests

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 Students serving the food. Assistant Principal, Dr Janet Prideaux, in the background

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Do you ‘like’ our new Facebook page?

I’m convinced that if you take the time and effort to do something, then it should be effective. Sounds obvious, I know, but here’s an example to elucidate. I’ve been writing posts in this blog for over a year now, and although I’m pleased to say that people are reading it, I noticed that it’s mainly teacher librarians from other schools. Whilst this is fabulous, and I appreciate the readership and feedback, I’m still wondering how to promote things to our own school community – the students, teachers and parents. Promotion is such an important part of doing anything at school; you could be spending all your time writing posts and documenting what’s happening with photos but if it doesn’t reach your primary audience, then something isn’t right.

So it occurred to me that a Facebook page might be the way to go. I know that seems obvious but it really isn’t going to be effective unless you know that enough people are on Facebook. Anyway, I’ve created the page – and here it is. It’s (obviously) called Melbourne High School Library. So far it has 49 likes and 11 friends. It’s a start.

Every blog post will be updated here, and I hope to attract more of our students, teachers and parents to the page, but also my very supportive network, some of whom have already given me the thumbs up. What I love about social media is that it brings so many people in, and I’m happy to see ex-students showing some interest in our new page. Thanks!

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Shortlist for the Melbourne Prize for Literature

The shortlist for the Melbourne Prize for Literature is out as well as the Best Writing.

The Melbourne Prize for Literature

The Best Writing Award