Feast on writing – MWF16

You could hear the pens scratching in the air. It’s the Melbourne Writers Festival 2016. There is a mix of writers; professional, emerging and students.

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Oliver, Year 12, shares his notes on Adam Curley, writer and musician:

The world of music magazines is filled with people interested in writing and music, but also gives you an opportunity to be published, and get feedback.

Song lyrics sit in a strange place – harder to study with less of a history – less a form of writing, differing styles between different writers. Began as storytelling, branches out.

For Adam, he is a vocalist, and lyricist, collaborating with his band Gold Class to write songs collectively.

Usually starts with a catalyst, a beat or rhythm in what his band members are writing – always has a notebook or his phone ready writing ideas, words, phrases, that could be used.

Melody can craft lyrics, and lyrics and melody. Inspiration – can be found anywhere! For his inspiration, Adam tends to look inside for his inspiration, taking from his feelings on issues, world or personal. However, other writers he knows write third person narratives, long abstract phrases, really it can be anything.

Style – impressionistic language surrounding a key idea or feeling.

Songs don’t have to follow on line by line, don’t have to be linear narratives.

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Reagan, Year 11, reflects on Meg Rosoff:

“Creating Great Characters” conducted by Meg Rosoff was perhaps the highlight of the Writers Festival. When entering the presentation, most of us witnessed Meg lounging about comfortably on the couch with her interviewer, giving little hint of the brilliant personality that lurked beneath. Excited chatter gave way to enraptured silence, broken only by the open laughter which greeted every deprecating remark she made of herself.

Meg spent the entire workshop detailing her own troubles with writing and rowdy dogs, her anecdote of the years she spent bluffing a book to her editor reducing the audience to a laughing wreck. Throughout the workshop, there was never a dull moment, the presentation being refreshing in that she genuinely downplayed all of her own achievements and awards. Meeting her afterwards, I could not help but purchase one of her books simply for a chance to meet her. Throughout her question session, she never made a single attempt to promote her works, but her warm and sincere thanks when I brought the book to be signed revealed more than a witty and humorous speaker, it exposed her as a writer with a true connection to her readers.

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Ayush, Year 9, shares his thoughts:

At the Melbourne Writers Festival 2016 we had the chance to see and listen to many writers and authors. One in particular stood out. Meg Rosoff, the author of How I Live Now, was a particularly interesting and entertaining person to listen to. She was a very funny person and her thoughts and ideas always caused the audience to chuckle. She was very fun and open as well which always kept the audiences attention. She was also very willing to talk about herself with a group of relative strangers which helped us understand her and her books in greater depth. Out of all the authors we watched and listened to this was, in my opinion, the best as she had intriguing ideas and stories and wasn’t afraid to put herself out there.

Noah, Year 11, writes:

One of the highlights of our day at the Melbourne Writers Festival was hearing author Meg Rossof talk about her writing process and how she worked on characters. Hearing her reminisce about her friend helping her with crucial plot points, how the characters got away from her with minds of their own at times, and how her story about characterising animals went off onto a long tangent about her own dog were all delightful, and her dry sense of humour punctuated every piece of advice or story, making it all the more enjoyable. I am certainly looking forward to reading some of her work, and I’ll be taking her advice on characters to heart. I must say, her admission that she often didn’t know where the book was going to go when she sat down took a weight off, and contrasted with the over-planning toted by many other writers. I would recommend the Writers Festival to anyone, especially with panels like this one!

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Frank, Year 11, writes:

At the Writers Festival is where I met Meg Rosoff, an accomplished author winning both the Guardian Prize as well as the Printz Award. She was one of the most inspiring writers, possessing great wit and was always charming. Yet despite winning prestigious awards, she was charming and incredibly down to earth.

She began the workshop of ‘Creating Great Characters’, by professing her love of dogs. She told us that “writers don’t have a sociable lives, that’s why I love dogs.” In her book Jonathan Unleashed (2016), all of the central character’s many problems, are all curiously resolved through two dogs. Although she laughingly admitted that dogs seldom solve the problems we experience in real life, “Dogs make good characters in books because you can make them into whatever you like.”

She then proceeded to give insight into the often-enigmatic writing process of an author. For one, there is no one definite way of writing, and that writing habits tend to differ from person to person. For Meg, she uses her ‘unconscious mind’, where a lot of the writing comes from the place in the brain responsible for dreaming. Where the conscious mind is compared to as a horse rider, the unconscious is mind is the horse itself, and sometimes, it may be better to let the horse lead for a change.

Undoubtedly, one of the highlights of the day, her unique advice in combination with her wonderful sense of humour really inspired us, hopefully, to take step towards a future filled with a little bit of creativity, and a little bit of writing.

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Daniel, Year 9, captures John Marsden’s creative writing session:

“In fourteen words we wrote our story. Without one vowel we described our view.”

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 Our pens will certainly be writing furiously following these inspiring sessions.

 

Welcome to the Gymbrary! – Year 12 muckup installation

It was amusing watching students come into the library this morning, the day of year 12 Muck Up, the day the library became a little like a gym and the gym looked a bit like the library. This was the creative effort of year 12s and we quite like it. Why not mix up spaces like this on a regular basis?

Oh yes, the students’ reactions as they came in – some were amused and surprised while others just walked straight past the gym equipment as if it wasn’t there and went straight for the table, sat down and into serious study. Well, it is Melbourne High after all.

The literary gym:

The Gymbrary

Dress up for us as well.

We were given 1 kg weights. How offensive! We can do at least one and a half.

I’ll probably post more photos at the end of the day.

Developing female characters – workshop with Kirsty Murray – and reading awards

Exciting day today with the annual Year 9 and 10 Reading Assembly celebrating reading. Prizes are awarded to students whose reading is prolific, demonstrating depth and breadth.

Some of our winners

A less serious pose

A highlight of the day was Kirsty Murray’s much anticipated writing workshop in which she focused on the development of female characters.By the end of the workshop students had created 20 unique female characters which they now have the opportunity to develop and integrate into a story.

Kirsty shared with us her criteria for good writing:

  • originality, a fresh perspective, using your own voice
  • good use of language – how words work; poetry sharpens use of language
  • good characters – driving force in all fiction; characters define the shape of the story
  • structure – the shape of the story

Heart of the school – St Martin of Tours Primary Library

Today I was delighted to be invited by Kim Yeomans to visit her library at St Martin of Tours Primary School. Kim is a super teacher librarian with a massive heart who brings the library to life with the help of a library technician who comes once a week – although if you stepped into the library and looked around at the evidence of the wonderful things that take place there you would think that it was staffed by many more people.

As a secondary school teacher librarian, I appreciate stepping into a primary school library because it reminds me of all the hard work that occurs before students start secondary school. What I saw today was a beautiful space lovingly and thoughtfully created and recreated regularly for the pleasure of children who come to immerse themselves in the worlds of books and reading.

Kim’s library walls are creative, visual displays of the worlds that prep-grade 6 children step into when they read and create. It’s a warm, enticing and stimulating communal space with nooks here and there, soft seating and areas with tables and chairs inviting children to gather in small groups or as a class. Oversized 3 dimensional book characters, some created by children and parents,  are reminders of worlds that come to life through reading and shared activities.

This is a world in which you want to linger, snuggle into a beanbag or sunny corner with a view of trees, escape the mundane and make time stand still. The colourful reading chair seems to be shifting impatiently, ready for a story with an eager audience. What better environment than this to introduce a love of reading, fantasy, ideas and creative possibilities? What better place than this to grow literacies without the pain of prescribed lessons? Where would you find community as happily as in these walls?

Who would be mad enough to envisage a primary school without the library, without the teacher librarian whose role description and daily roster would intimidate the most hard working leading teacher? And yet there are schools who forget this – perhaps in the busyness of day to day routines or in the name of change and technologies – how absolutely precious and indispensable all primary school libraries are, just as they continue to be in secondary school and higher education.

Thank you, Kim, for inviting me into your gorgeous library and chatting to me about all the wonderful things you make happen for the children you love so much. You can read more about what happens in this library by reading the St Martin of Tours library blog.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tea duelling/Michael Pryor visit/ Steampunk dress ups

What a day we had – Michael Pryor’s visit and workshop, the Reading Awards assembly, and our inaugural Tea Duelling event (see previous post for information). Thanks, Denise, for making this happen down to the smallest detail. We even had Mr Brown’s original Steampunk composition playing. Well done to all the boys who participated in the duelling heats. There wasn’t much jousting but there was plenty of nomming and splodging. (Tablecloths definitely need a wash now). And, of course, much biscuit dunking and tea drinking.

I apologise for the bad quality videos but I think they were not uploaded in high definition. Lots of photos too so be prepared to scroll down a lot. Thanks also to Ms Buckland for the Reading Awards and workshop. Thanks for coming and for being such a good sport, Michael.

The videos are not in heat order.

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2014 Dromkeen Librarian’s Award – Pam Saunders

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Recently our head of library, Pam Saunders, was awarded the Dromkeen Librarian’s Award which

is presented to a teacher, a teacher librarian or a children’s librarian, working within or outside the education system, in recognition of the important role played by this person in introducing young people to literature and encouraging an enjoyment and love of reading.

The award is presented to a person who has demonstrated outstanding commitment to children’s literature.

Pam’s experience in libraries and schools is broad: she has worked in a variety of settings – primary and secondary schools, public libraries and the Centre for Youth Literature at the State Library of Victoria. She has worked with babies in arms, with their parents, with young and older children and teenagers.

At the centre of Pam’s passion for libraries and their patrons is her love of reading.

Books are a place of pleasure and a beautiful way to de-stress. I also believe books and stories are the best way to walk in someone’s shoes.

The empathy a reader fosters from reading is invaluable; reading is much more than decoding of words.

 I asked Pam to share some of her observations of the reading culture at Melbourne High School since she took up the position of head of library at the beginning of the year.

Here at Melbourne High School many of our boys read. Science Fiction and Fantasy are continually popular and need little promotion. Many of the boys also read and enjoy the classics, and there is an expectation within the school community that reading the classics is ‘a good thing’. As the students progress into higher levels of study, reading for pleasure  can fall but we work hard to make sure they still find time to de-stress with a book, matching the right title to the right student. Somewhere in amongst all the academic rigour I hope that the joy for reading remains.

To what does she attribute her passion for reading?

I was fortunate to have become a reader on the lap of my father as he read to me. I  remember walking as a very young child to the shop to buy the new magazine Playhour and then my father reading it to me, especially the comics. This was further fostered by a dynamic school librarian, Mrs Cecilia Stubbs, who ran the library at Burnie High School in the 1970s. She encouraged students to use the library, to be involved and, best of all, she challenged my reading, pushing me to read titles which I would not have discovered myself. Titles like Black like me by John Griffin. I hope I have emulated her as a librarian.

We congratulate Pam on her prestigious award, and we are proud to have her nurture our reading culture at Melbourne High School.

The Dromkeen Medal and Dromkeen Librarian’s Award have a distinguished history of over 32 years, with previous Medal recipients including well-known children’s book illustrators and authors such as Shaun Tan, Bronwyn Bancroft, Roland Harvey, Ruth Park and Graeme Base (MHS Old Boy!) Similarly distinguished names grace the list of past winners of the Librarian’s Award.

Celebrating the freedom to read – gearing up for Banned Books Week

We’re gearing up for Banned Books Week next week when we celebrate the freedom to read, and the freedom for all people to access information, by highlighting books which have been (or are) banned in different parts of the world. Basically, it’s a time to collectively insist on the free expression and exchange of ideas.

We have a designated area for people who wish to be photographed reading a banned book. Don’t miss out on your turn to make yourself comfortable on our royal chair (replete with velvet seat and gold-painted arm rests) to read (or pretend to read) the banned book of your choice.

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